How I learned to stop worrying and love random inbound email

I've been in venture for about a decade now - three years as analyst-associate-principal at Atlas Venture (now Accomplice), a year as a VP at Accel, and over five years as a general partner at Sunstone. Over that time I've received tens of thousands of unsolicited inbound emails. And for a very, very long time, I prided myself on the fact that I'd respond to all of them.

But a few things have changed over the last years. Most obviously, the volume in our market has gone up significantly. Everyone wants to be in tech. Then, there are many different inboxes now - from email to LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook. It's hard to keep up. And a few years ago, founders figured out how to mass-customize personalized emails. Some of them are very sophisticated and so not all the "personal" email I get is really all that personal.

At the same time, I've built a sizable portfolio (ten companies), with a number of high-involvement board seats, got married, had two beautiful kids. And so time is in shorter supply than it used to be.

All that means that I will start using a different process for unsolicited email from people that I do not know. I will still try and reply to a few a day. I like the serendipity of it and some areas and people intrigue me. I did the very first investment based on a cold inbound email earlier this year - which was in response to a DTC blog post. I loved that.

But for the large majority of emails, if I haven't gotten to them after a week I will move on and they will never get a reply. 

As you know we have a team of associates, Deepka Rana in Berlin/London and Philippe Collet in Copenhagen/Stockholm. You might have better luck reaching them. Or there's always the possibility of talking to someone I know and trust to be a good filter for me. That will always remain the best way to get in touch.

Btw, this post was inspired by a 2013 AVC blog post. Thanks Fred for leading the way on trying to stay sane using our new superpowers of communications.