Build community first - a startup strategy neglected to Europe's detriment

I've previously written about how customer experience is the #1 dimension of differentiation for digitally native vertically integrated brands (DNVBs). Which is why it's baffling to me that the "community first" strategy seems to be largely neglected in companies we see in Europe.

Starting with building an engaged audience first can be a huge boon:

- It helps you truly get to know your customers. DNVBs depend massively on this intimacy. Over time you can use data to monitor every interaction, but in the beginning you need to learn qualitatively. Talking to hundreds of potential customers means building the intuition you need to nail product and voice over time. And this is really your moat - no traditional brand that is disconnected from its customers by the channel is able to do this. 

- Building a community first means having built-in distribution later. A lot of the DNVBs we see in Europe are too dependent on paid acquisition. Margins may be high and lifetime values much higher than in retail ecommerce, but continuously paying 30% of your LTV in CAC makes your business much less profitable than it could be. Building community focuses you on organic or even viral acquisition. 

- Hiring outstanding talent is really what turns a great founding team with a great market opportunity into a category-defining, multi-billion dollar company. Recruiting from inside a community that is already passionate about your vertical means people will come to work for you with a spring in their step every morning. Your dreams are their dreams. That's how magic happens, especially at the early stages.

- A community passionate about a vertical will forgive many, many missteps as founders try to build a business. The engagement is emotional - this is true connection and support. It's hard to overstate how helpful this can be as founders invariably screw up along the journey. 

- The authenticity of a community with the founders as leaders at its center will drive enterprise value: both when you're raising from angels and VCs, but also when you're considering an exit. Community is a moat from a finance pov as well. 

- And beyond all that - it's truly scrappy: much cheaper to start with just content than trying to make a product and sell it right away. 

Building a community can work across all social platforms: Instagram is the most obvious one for DNVBs, but it can work on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Snap or even through good old email and text. 

I currently recommend trying this path rather than relying on desk research or cloning a US competitor perceived to be doing well.